Frequently Asked Questions

Is it safe to take Girl Uninterrupted® for several months or even years?

Girl Uninterrupted® can be taken as needed for months or even years.  It is a dietary supplement, not a drug, which offers PMS relief.  As with all dietary supplements, however, you should check with your doctor before taking GirlU to ensure that it reacts well with any other regular medications you may be taking.

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What are the ingredients in Girl Uninterrupted®?

Girl Uninterrupted® is a plant based supplement with a proprietary blend of amino acids and herbs that specifically combat the most common symptoms of PMS. The six active ingredients are Griffonia Seed Extract, Green Tea Extract, Cranberry, Saw Palmetto, Red Clover and Chaste Tree Berry. For more information on the specific ingredients, take a look at the Girl Uninterrupted® PMS Supplement page.
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How often do I take Girl Uninterrupted®?

Girl Uninterrupted® is to be taken on an as needed basis, so only during those PMS days of the month.  It works fast (15 minutes) and lasts a long time (12 hours).  Other natural brands require a pill every 4 hours and some even require 2-3 tablets a day for an entire month!

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Is the Girl Uninterrupted® PMS Relief supplement certified Peak-X free?

Yes, Girl Uninterrupted® is certified both Peak-E and Peak-X free.
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Why is Girl Uninterrupted® packaged in a compact?

Girl Uninterrupted® is packaged in a compact to allow women to carry capsules discreetly and stylishly. Most of our competitors package their pills in bulky bottles that cannot be carried easily in a purse, backpack or gym bag. Plus, the huge “PMS Relief” label on the bottle announces the contents to the world. We do not put PMS Relief on the compact so no one will know what condition you are treating unless you decide to tell.
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Why is Girl Uninterrupted® different than other PMS products?

Girl Uninterrupted® is manufactured for today's young woman on the go.  It is specifically formulated to treat PMS symptoms, unlike an OTC medicine which also treats sore throats and headaches.  The portability of the product and the dosage flexibility allow you to power through those PMS days, read The Girl Uninterrupted Difference page for more information.
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Why do I have PMS?

PMS symptoms often occur as a part of a woman's natural monthly cycle, when there are many hormonal and biological changes at work. Unfortunately, doctors don't know why different women have different symptoms, or why PMS symptoms vary and are worse in some women.
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When will I get PMS?

Remember, not everyone has PMS symptoms; however, PMS can start at any time. While some women first experience it in their teens or early 20's, other women may make it to 30 without experiencing any symptoms.  Unfortunately, PMS may get worse in your 40s or 50s, as menopause nears.
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How long does PMS last?

PMS symptoms are tied to your monthly hormonal changes and can last 3-5 days prior to the onset of your period.
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When will I get my first period?

Girls generally start their periods 2.5 years after they begin to develop breasts, usually around age 12-13.
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What is a menstrual cycle?

Your cycle begins on the first day of your period and lasts approximately 28 days.  During the first 14 days of your cycle, your body produces more estrogen, which triggers the thickening of the lining of your uterus and the production of an egg by your ovaries.  In the second half of your cycle (days 15-28), the egg is released and your body makes more progesterone to prepare for a possible pregnancy.  If the egg is not fertilized, the uterine lining is shed through your period and the cycle starts over.
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How do I use a menstrual calendar?

Tracking your cycle is easier than ever with the wide selection of menstrual calendar apps available for both Apple and Android platforms.  Many of them are free and many help you plan or avoid pregnancy and track certain symptoms.   To start, enter in the first and last days of your most recent period. The app will help you calculate information such as your average cycle and the start date of future periods.  Many people also rely on this information for doctor's visits and planning vacations.
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Is period bloating real or just a myth?

Period bloating is definitely real—in fact, it's actually one of the most common symptoms of PMS.  It comes from water retention, which is influenced by hormonal changes during your cycle.
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What about weight gain during my period?

Unless you really overeat for weeks leading up to your period, weight gain during your period is actually water weight gain. "Fat" weight gain is not typical; water weight gain is real, but it is temporary.
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How can I get rid of period bloating?

While it might seen counterproductive, drink more water to flush out excess water.  One helpful tip is to limit salty foods if you feel bloated.  Diuretics will leave your body dehydrated, so avoid those as well.  And remember, in reality, period bloating is most noticeable to you!  It is never as bad as your think it is and no one else probably see what you are feeling.
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Why do I get PMS cramps?

When an egg is not fertilized, the lining of your uterus is not needed. In order to shed the lining of your uterus and your period to come, your uterine muscles need to contract—that's all PMS cramps really are.   
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Any tips to get rid of cramps fast?

For mild cramps, an over the counter analgesic works.  An old-fashioned hot water bottle or heating pad to the lower back or belly feels soothing as well.  If your cramps are severe, consult with your doctor.
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Why do I have sore breasts during my period?

Are you pregnant? Check that first, but sore breasts are also a symptom of PMS. Rising progesterone levels make the breast tissue, especially the nipples, very sensitive.
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Why am I so exhausted before my period?

Fatigue before your period is a result of hormonal changes in the last phase of your menstrual cycle, and the dip in certain hormones can have you struggling to keep your eyes open.  Fatigue generally lasts a couple of days, so if you can grab a nap or get some extra rest, do it! Other helpful tips for fighting fatigue before your period are drinking plenty of fluids (but not caffeinated beverages) and eating a clean, healthy diet.  Gentle exercise, like a relaxing yoga flow or a walk outside, can actually be the best way to boost your energy levels.
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Why do I get hormonal acne?

Hormonal changes trigger your body to secrete excess oil.  When the oil gets trapped in your pores, it often turns into pimples. Hormonal acne tends to flare up around the jaw area and forehead.
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How do I prevent or treat hormonal acne?

Excess oil happens, but there are some things you can do to be proactive if you're experiencing hormonal acne. First, always remove your makeup and wash your face at the end of the day.  During the day, keep your hands off your face!  Hands have bacteria, and you don't want to add that to your pores.  Lastly, don't squeeze and pop zits because it can scar. 
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Why do I experience nausea before my period?

Quick check: are you pregnant? If not, then you are experiencing an unpleasant effect of the change in levels of estrogen and progesterone toward the end of your cycle. These changes can sometimes, unfortunately, result in nausea before your period.
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Do women with PMS have different hormone levels?

No. Women with PMS do not have too little or too much estrogen or progesterone. Hormone levels in women with PMS are normal throughout the cycle, but the effects of the hormones are different depending on the woman.
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Can PMS mimic symptoms of other conditions?

Definitely. Women who believe they have PMS may have other conditions, including thyroid-related problems, anxiety disorders, panic attacks, diabetes, or even early onset menopause. The only way to be sure that these conditions are not present is to consult your doctor.
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Can my PMS symptoms actually be a sign of depression?

Depression and other emotional reactions are common symptoms of PMS. You may feel irritable, anxious, tense, withdrawn or have difficulty sleeping or eating. You might also experience mood swings. These feelings should go away when your period starts. Depression and PMS are different, but some studies have shown that women with PMS may be predisposed or especially vulnerable to feelings of depression.
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Can PMS worsen other medical or psychiatric problems?

Yes. Women wrestling with a variety of conditions may experience the worsening of their symptoms from those conditions during the one to two weeks before they get their period. These conditions can include migraine headaches, diabetes, asthma, allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, seizures, depression, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, and eating disorders.
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The PMS FAQ information, answers and solutions above are general in nature; please consult with your doctor should you have specific questions.